“Three ‘S’s for super communions”

Tuesday Teaching Tips: Episode 123

1. Presentation

  • Short
  • 1 Scripture
  • 1 point
  • Story – emotionally engaging, but not emotionally overwhelming
  • Avoid jargon

2. Focus – 1 Cor 11, Lk 22

  • Jesus
  • Proclaim his death
  • Relevant scripture
  • Why taking bread and wine – what is the connection?

Conclusion

  • Feedback please
  • Feel free to disagree, but not to be disagreeable!
  • More material on the website and YouTube playlist

The three “S”s….

  • USE ONE SCRIPTURE TO ..
  • REFRESH MY GRATITUDE FOR MY SAVIOUR TO GIVE ME ..
  • STRENGTH FOR THE DAYS AHEAD

If you’d like a copy of my free eBook on spiritual disciplines, “How God grows His people”, sign up at my website.

Thanks again for watching. Have a terrific Tuesday, and a wonderful week.

God bless, Malcolm

“How to deliver an extemporary communion”

Tuesday Teaching Tips, Episode 115

You might have heard of the ‘sermunion’.

Have you tried an extemporary communion talk?

Ben May preached on the parable of the wedding banquet, Matt 22.1-14

““But when the king came in to see the guests, he noticed a man there who was not wearing wedding clothes. He asked, ‘How did you get in here without wedding clothes, friend?’ The man was speechless. “Then the king told the attendants, ‘Tie him hand and foot, and throw him outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’” (Matthew 22:11–13 NIV11)

I composed an extemporary communion.

Clothing – Gal 3.26-29
“So in Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith, for all of you who were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. If you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.” (Galatians 3:26–29 NIV11)

Could have added disrobing of Jesus on cross so we can be robed.

Tips
1. Know what the speaker’s topic/scripture is beforehand
2. Make notes during the sermon – surprising how more comes to mind when see it written down
3. Don’t force it – if necessary read 1 Cor 11.23-26 and pray

Conclusion
* Tried it?
* Downsides?

Questions
Your thoughts?

Comments….

Pass it on ….

Like & Subscribe….

Thank you for watching this video. You can find more teaching tips here and on the YouTube teaching tips playlist.

Please add your comments on this week’s topic. We learn best when we learn in community.

Do you have a question about teaching the Bible? Is it theological, technical, practical? Send me your questions or suggestions. Here’s the email: malcolm@malcolmcox.org.

Thanks again for watching. Have a terrific Tuesday, and a wonderful week.

God bless,

Malcolm

“How to talk meaningfully about the communion: Part 5”

Tuesday Teaching Tips: Episode 111

How can we avoid dull repetition or creative confusion when talking about the Lord’s supper?

This is the fifth in a series looking at different views of the atonement as a way of broadening and deepening our appreciation for the cross.

Today we study Paul’s teaching on the Lord’s Supper in 1 Corinthians 11 to help us understand the meaning of the communion.

We explore some tips on how meaningful communions are constructed and on what they are best focussed.

Questions

What are your thoughts on how we can make the communion talks biblical and relevant? How we do it and what we emphasise?
Please add your comments on this week’s topic. We learn best when we learn in community.
Next week: an interview with Simon Dinning of “prepared to answer” podcast – look it up.
God bless, Malcolm
NOTES:
Summary
  • Christus Victor saves by conquering evil
  • Penal substitution saves by satisfying the wrath of God
  • Healing view saves by curing and restoring
A. What is it’s purpose? 1 Cor 11.23-26
  • Remembrance
  • Community function
  • Strengthen faith, hearts, community
B. What are we to proclaim?
  • Christ’s death
  • Solidarity together in this (shared meal)
C. What are we to practice?
Many debatable elements – all have our preferences
  • Cups: 1 / many cups
  • Liquids: Grape juice / wine
  • Prayers: one / two
  • Participants: adults / children; Christians / non-Christians
Core issues
  • Centre: Christ – not the personal sharing/story/illustration
  • Word: scripture relating to the cross and its purpose
  • God: what He has done – not what we are to do
  • Because: remind why taking bread and wine. Confirm at end of talk or during prayer.
Suggestions
  • One scripture
  • One story
  • One idea

“How to talk meaningfully about the communion: Part 4”

Tuesday Teaching Tips: Episode 110

I have a passion to do my best to make sure that our congregation’s members can take a meaningful communion every week. I believe we can avoid dull repetition and boredom. And the opposite problem of going off-topic in such of creativity. The answer, as usual, is to go deeper. I have taught on the atonement a few times, and found this to be tremendously helpful in my thinking about the communion.

I share today about one of the models of the atonement – that called, “Healing”.

Let me know what you think of this model. In what way is it helpful? How could this view of atonement be brought to life in a communion talk?  What scriptures, images, stories would give people sense of being healed, as they take bread and wine, that they are restored, reconciled, adopted into God’s family?

Please leave a comment in the comment box below. We learn best when we learn in community.

Please pass the link to this recording on to one other person so that they may benefit.

Click like, and subscribe you haven’t already done so. If you have time, leave a review which will help us gain greater visibility for these recordings.

Thanks so much for watching and listening. I hope you have a terrific Tuesday and a wonderful week.

God bless, Malcolm

Scriptures referenced or alluded to in this recording:

“The atonement means that the relationship between humans and God is restored (healed). The central piece in this restoration is that God, through the Servant who personally takes on all our iniquities, grants forgiveness of sins….The punishment for our sins, which was often meted out in terms of suffering, sickness and calamity, has also been taken on by that Servant. His absorption of both the sin and its punishment is the means to our healing and restoration, by grace bringing us shalom or well-being in all its richness.” The Nature of the Atonement”, p130

“How to talk meaningfully about the Communion”: Part 3

Tuesday Teaching Tips: Episode 109

I have a passion to do my best to make sure that our congregation’s members can take a meaningful communion every week. I believe we can avoid dull repetition and boredom. And the opposite problem of going off-topic in such of creativity. The answer, as usual, is to go deeper. I have taught on the atonement a few times, and found this to be tremendously helpful in my thinking about the communion. I share today about one of the models of the atonement – that called, “Substitutionary”.

Let me know what you think of this model. In what way is it helpful? How could this view of atonement be brought to life in a communion talk? What scriptures, images, stories would give people confidence, as they take bread and wine, that their sin-debt has been paid, that their guilt has been removed, that Jesus died in their place ?

Please leave a comment in the comment box below. We learn best when we learn in community.

Please pass the link to this recording on to one other person so that they may benefit.

Click like, and subscribe you haven’t already done so. If you have time, leave a review which will help us gain greater visibility for these recordings.

Thanks so much for watching and listening. I hope you have a terrific Tuesday and a wonderful week.

God bless, Malcolm

Scriptures referenced or alluded to in this recording:

“How to talk meaningfully about the Communion”: Part 2

Tuesday Teaching Tips: Episode 108

I have a passion to do my best to make sure that our congregation’s members can take a meaningful communion every week. I believe we can avoid dull repetition and boredom. And the opposite problem of going off-topic in such of creativity. The answer, as usual, is to go deeper. I have taught on the atonement a few times, and found this to be tremendously helpful in my thinking about the communion. I share today about one of the models of the atonement – that called, “Christus Victor”.

Let me know what you think of this model. In what way is it helpful? How might it assist you in preparing a talk about the communion? What scriptures, images, stories would give people confidence, as they take bread and wine, that they are set free, released and on the winning side?

Please leave a comment in the comment box below. We learn best when we learn in community.

Please pass the link to this recording on to one other person so that they may benefit.

Click like, and subscribe you haven’t already done so. If you have time, leave a review which will help us gain greater visibility for these recordings.

Thanks so much for watching and listening. I hope you have a terrific Tuesday and a wonderful week.

God bless, Malcolm

Scriptures referenced:

“How to give a meaningful talk about the communion”, Part 1

Tuesday Teaching Tips: Episode 107

How can we avoid dull repetition or creative confusion when talking about the Lord’s supper?

I begin a series looking at different views of the atonement as a way of broadening and deepening our appreciation for the cross.

Please add your comments on this week’s topic. We learn best when we learn in community.

Do you have a question about teaching the Bible? Is it theological, technical, practical? Send me your questions or suggestions. Here’s the email: malcolm@malcolmcox.org.

Thanks again for watching. Have a terrific Tuesday, and a wonderful week.

God bless,

Malcolm

“Three-word slogans”

Tuesday Teaching Tips: Episode 98

I’ve been frustrated with my own difficulty in summarising the speaking parts of the service. More words can make things more unclear.

How would you summarise these parts of the service in three words?

* Welcome
* Prayer
* Communion
* HOPE talk
* Sermon
* Close

Do you have a question about teaching the Bible? Is it theological, technical, practical? Send me your questions or suggestions. Here’s the email: malcolm@malcolmcox.org.
Please leave a comment, and pass it on …

Thanks again for listening. Have a terrific Tuesday, and a wonderful week.

God bless,

Malcolm

Episode 12, Sunday Sample, 19 November 2017

Reflections on Corporate Worship

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Locations: Watford and Bracknell

Special Occasion: none

I was involved in services in Watford and Bracknell this last Sunday. Our entry to the building in Watford was delayed due to a misunderstanding about parking, but we got in eventually. Everyone rushed around setting up before taking a deep breath for a pre-service devotional. We needed it. We were all frazzled.

We reflected on Hezekiah’s prayer, then God’s promise of healing, followed by the King’s poem of praise, culminating in this phrase:

“The Lord will save me, and we will sing with stringed instruments all the days of our lives in the temple of the Lord.” (Isaiah 38:20 NIV11)

He knew why he was singing. His fellow-congregants knew why they were singing. See the “we” word in verse 20?  We also know why we sing. The point is not “what” we are about to do, but “why”. Focussing on the “why” helped us to worship and to lead worship with a clearer mind and heart. It’s an important reminder to me that we need those few moments to pray and remember what it’s all about.

Speakers

Charl gave us a communion talk with a difference in Watford. You may see the table, tablecloth, vase and flower between Barry and Kate in the photo above. He asked for volunteers for a demonstration and then set up Barry and Kate as if on a date in a restaurant. Romantic music played through the PA system. Charl spoke about what makes meals special before going on to describe the extra-special nature of the communion. His points were sound and well-made. But what I especially appreciated was the creative thinking that went into preparing and presenting his talk.

Osagie is in action below preaching in Watford. He is another one never short of a handy way to illustrate his points. His use of children’s play tiles was masterful. You’ll have to click here to see him in action on the YouTube channel.

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Music Worship

We tried a new song-sandwich in Watford. The first three verses of “Soon and very soon” were followed by “Shine, Jesus, Shine” and concluded with the final two verses of “Soon and very”. All in G.It didn’t really work. The problem was that we started too fast and had to slow down for “Shine” and then speed up again for the final part of “Soon”. It wasn’t a disaster, but the effect I was looking for didn’t happen. I’m going to try it again this coming Sunday in Lower Earley. We’ll sing the first half of “Soon” slowly, segue into “Shine” and then speed up for the second half of “Soon”. I’ll let you know how that goes next week.

In Bracknell, the stand-out musical item was a new song by Geraldine Latty, “Lord, you hear the cry“. I thoroughly recommend it. How many songs do we sing about the marginalised and needy? Not many. It goes well with the point in our services when we take a collection for HOPE Worldwide UK. Have a look at the lyrics and chord charts here.

Other Thoughts

Last week I said we’d do the following:

  1. Have song sheets for everyone in Watford. Done.
  2. Start the service in Bracknell with a 5-minute countdown video. Done.

Next Sunday we’ll do the following:

  1. Have a devotional for all the service participants that includes one minute of silence – “For God alone my soul waits in silence; from him comes my salvation.” Psalm 62.1, (NRSV)
  2. Have a second bash a the S&S song-sandwich in Lower Earley.

Please comment on what you’re doing with your services. What are you trying that’s working? What is God teaching you?

Share reflections with us so we can grow and please God.

You can leave a comment below.

God bless,

Malcolm

The Sunday Sample 3rd September 2017

Reflections on Corporate Worship

Date:  Sunday 3rd September 2017

Location: Bracknell

Special Occasion: none

The service in Bracknell this Sunday was a delight. Most summer wanderers had returned. It was good to see familiar faces again. Many of which had been significantly tanned. 

Speakers

Tim Dannatt preached. I shared the communion talk. Elliot and Emily talked about HOPE worldwide and the Patel family welcomed us. A few notes on what I observed.
Elliot and Emily teased us about a presentation they will be doing about the Zambia HOPE Youth Corp at the beginning of October. They used the technique of repeatedly saying they were going to tell us things then, but not now. This created strong engagement with the congregation through the humour of the repetition. It also meant that there was no way we were going to forget what they were promoting!
I liked the way that Harry and Saroj involved their children by having them read Scripture. We could tell that neither of the children felt pressurised, although, of course, they looked a bit embarrassed. And I especially liked the fact that Saroj clearly had thought carefully about what she was going to pray about and how she was going to pray. In the devotional before we began the service, she asked if there were any prayer needs. Then when she actually prayed, she did so with a good blend of formal and extemporary tone.
  
Videos of Tim’s sermon is here.

Audio available at the Thames Valley churches of Christ iTunes podcast.

Music Worship

I mentioned last week that we were going to try something different. Here’s how it went. We did a three song opening set all in the key of G. Beginning with the first two verses of “Amazing Grace”, then moving straight into “Anchor for the soul”, straight into “How great is our God”, and finishing with the final verse of “Amazing grace”. The congregation loved it!  I can’t claim that I originated the idea – heard it somewhere else. Something about the flow helped the congregation get into the spirit of why we were praising God, and connecting with the God whom we were praising.

Other Thoughts

Here’s a pre-service devotional idea I tried this Sunday. Before starting the devotional I handed a small picture to every person involved in the service. It was a photograph I had taken of a cyclist silhouetted against bright sunlight. I used it to symbolise what God has done for us in bringing us out of darkness into light, 1 Peter 2.9. Then I remarked that we are people praising the one and leading the worship in praise of the one who brought us out of darkness into his wonderful night.

Nothing I said was remarkable, but having a photograph in the hand helped people to connect more strongly with the point. Several of those present mentioned how helpful this was. We must never underestimate the value of physical props helping us to communicate our message.

Last week I said I would:

  1. Experiment with an opening set three-song medley sandwich in Bracknell. Done
  2. Lead a devotional for all involved in the service in Bracknell. Done

The focus for next Sunday: I’m on holiday!

Please comment on what you’re doing locally with your services. What are you trying that’s working? What is God teaching you?

Share reflections with us so we can grow and please God.

You can leave a comment below.

God bless,

Malcolm